Harvard study online dating


12-Feb-2020 09:38

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Finally, attraction seems to lead to a reduction in serotonin, a hormone that’s known to be involved in appetite and mood.

Interestingly, people who suffer from obsessive-compulsive disorder also have low levels of serotonin, leading scientists to speculate that this is what underlies the overpowering infatuation that characterizes the beginning stages of love.

Google the phrase “biology of love” and you’ll get answers that run the gamut of accuracy.

Needless to say, the scientific basis of love is often sensationalized, and as with most science, we don’t know enough to draw firm conclusions about every piece of the puzzle.

Scientists in fields ranging from anthropology to neuroscience have been asking this same question (albeit less eloquently) for decades.

D: Several of the regions of the brain that affect love.

High levels of dopamine and a related hormone, norepinephrine, are released during attraction.

These chemicals make us giddy, energetic, and euphoric, even leading to decreased appetite and insomnia – which means you actually can be so “in love” that you can’t eat and can’t sleep.

In fact, norepinephrine, also known as noradrenalin, may sound familiar because it plays a large role in the fight or flight response, which kicks into high gear when we’re stressed and keeps us alert.

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Brain scans of people in love have actually shown that the primary “reward” centers of the brain, including the and the caudate nucleus (Figure 1), fire like crazy when people are shown a photo of someone they are intensely attracted to, compared to when they are shown someone they feel neutral towards (like an old high school acquaintance).Think of the last time you ran into someone you find attractive.